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Cisco training is designed for people who want to learn about routers and switches. Routers connect networks of computers over the internet or lines dedicated for that purpose. It's most probable that your first course should be your CCNA. Avoid jumping straight into your CCNP as it's a considerable step up - and you should gain some working knowledge before you take this on.

Cisco CCNA Retraining Compared

Cisco training is designed for people who want to learn about routers and switches. Routers connect networks of computers over the internet or lines dedicated for that purpose. It’s most probable that your first course should be your CCNA. Avoid jumping straight into your CCNP as it’s a considerable step up – and you should gain some working knowledge before you take this on.

As routers are connected to networks, it’s vital to know the operation of networks, or you will have difficulties with the qualification and be unable to do the work. Seek out a program that includes basic networking skills (such as CompTIA) before you get going on CCNA.

The CCNA qualification is the right level in this instance – don’t be cajoled into attempting your CCNP straight away. Once you’ve worked for a few years you will know if you need to train up to this level. If so, you’ll be much more capable to succeed at that stage – as your working knowledge will put everything into perspective.

It’s essential to have the most up to date Microsoft (or any other key organisation’s) authorised simulation materials and exam preparation packages.

Often students can get confused by practicing questions for their exams that aren’t from official sources. Quite often, the question formats and phraseology is startlingly different and you should be prepared for this.

Simulated exams can be very useful in helping you build your confidence – so that when you come to take the proper exam, you don’t get uptight.

If you may be starting with a trainer who still utilises workshops as part of their program, then consider these typical downsides experienced by the majority of IT hopefuls:

* Periodic travelling – hundreds of miles most times.

* Availability of classes; normally Mon-Fri and usually 2-3 days at a time. It’s not easy to get the days away from work.

* Most of us think 4 weeks holiday each year isn’t enough by far. Sacrifice a big chunk of this for study workshops and see your problems doubled.

* Workshops typically get bloated with students.

* Some trainees lean towards a somewhat more suitable pace – rather than be dictated to by the rest of the class. Often this can bring about a classic case of ‘classroom tension’.

* Quite a lot of trainees tell us of the considerable cost of getting to and from the training school while forking out for food and accommodation can get very expensive.

* You should never risk the possibility of letting yourself be side-stepped for potential advancement or wage increases because your employer knows you’re retraining.

* Posing questions in front of other class-mates will often make any one of us feel uncomfortable. Surely, at some point, you’ve avoided asking a question just because you honestly thought you might seem thick?

* Living away for part of your working week – a lot of students find they have to work or live away for certain parts of their study. Events are therefore hard to get to, yet the money has already changed hands when you paid initially.

For a far more flexible approach, make use of filmed classes at home, in comfort – taking them when it’s convenient to you – not someone else.

Do them at home on your computer or use your laptop to enjoy the sun. If you have any questions, then utilise the 24×7 Support (that we hope you’ll insist on with any technical courses.)

You could repeat the elements as many times as you need to. And of course, you don’t have to write any notes because the class is available whenever you want it.

Basically: Time and money is saved, you have reduced hassle and you altogether avoid killing more trees.

(C) Scott Edwards 2009. Navigate to www.ccnatraining4.co.uk or HERE.

About Emma G.

Working in the marketing industry since 2002. This blog is one of my hobbies.

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